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IBAN NL62INGB0004011891 BIC / SWIFT-Code: INGBNL2A ING Bank-Amsterdam. ActieZwerfhonden Zonnemaire The Netherlands

EU

Table of Contents

Useful links concerning the legislation with relation to the international transportation of dogs, cats and ferrets.

Legislation as from July 3rd 2004

 

 

Information with relation to the international transportation of dogs, cats and ferrets can be found here,

 

English, click here

Since 3 July 2004, new legislation will make it easier for you to take your pet dog, cat or ferret with you on journeys in the European Union. The Member States of the European Union have harmonised their legislation on the non-commercial transport of pet dogs, cats and ferrets. This means that from 3 July, countries in the European Union will apply nearly identical veterinary requirements for pets travelling with their owners.

(note webmaster)However there are some exceptions, f.e. United Kingdom, so allways check before travelling!!!!!

Dogs, cats and ferrets from EU Member States
From 3 July 2004, the non-commercial movement of pet dogs, cats and ferrets within the European Union must comply with the following veterinary requirements:

Pet animals must be identified. In the Netherlands, the most popular method used to identify animals is the electric transponder (microchip), which is inserted just under the skin. A clearly readable tattoo is also accepted as identification. Both means of identification are applied by a veterinarian.

Dogs, cats and ferrets must be vaccinated against rabies by an authorised veterinarian, who must certify that the animal has a valid rabies vaccination in the EU passport.

A compulsory blood test must be taken for pet dogs, cats or ferrets travelling to the United Kingdom, Ireland, Malta and Sweden. The blood sample must be taken by an authorised veterinarian (for United Kingdom and Ireland 6 months, for Sweden 4-12 months after the last vaccination) before the date of entry and must have a satisfactory result.

Dogs, cats and ferrets must be accompanied by an EU passport on journeys between Member States. The passport should provide the animal’s identification, the owner’s name and address, and proof that the animal has a valid vaccination against rabies.

In the Netherlands, EU passports for pet animals are publised by the Koninklijke Nederlandse Maatschappij voor Diergeneeskunde (Royal Netherlands Veterinary Association), Full Service Bureau Dierenasielen Nederland, Vereniging van Beroepsmatige Kennelhouders and Stichting Chip. The EU passports published by these four organisations are approved by the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality. Pet owners can apply to their veterinarian to obtain an EU passport for their pet. They will receive a Dutch version of the passport.

Dogs, cats and ferrets from non-EU countries
As of 3 July 2004, the following rules apply to pet dogs, cats and ferrets entering the European Union (except the United Kingdom, Ireland, Malta and Sweden) from non-EU countries:

The animals must have an electric transponder or clearly readable tattoo to identify them.

Dogs, cats and ferrets must be vaccinated against rabies.

Dogs, cats and ferrets crossing an EU border must be accompanied by a standard certificate which identifies the animal, gives the owner’s name and address, and certifies that the animals was vaccinated against rabies.

Animals entering the European Union from a country which is not on the list below, must undergo a blood test that provides evidence of the animal’s vaccination against rabies.